BCR #32: 28th June 2007 – social media clutter

by Lee Hopkins on June 29, 2007 · 8 comments

in bcr pod/vidcast,podcasting

Today’s vlog looks at the clutter that is my social media world in this age of professional eavesdropping, and what I intend to do about it.

If you are reading this post on my blog, you can watch the video from there, but if you receive this via email, you won’t see the video so will have to instead nip over to YouTube and watch it.

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  • http://www.live365.com/stations/claren44 Clarence Jones

    I agree wholeheartedly. I cannot allow myself to participate in any new social media sites/forums (fora?)/networking sites, because I don’t have enough free time to fully participate where I already am. I don’t want to water down my online life anymore! Even though LinkedIn & Facebook tempt me with the (fairly remote) possibility of making connections to improve the quality of my life ( & earn above poverty-level paychecks), I gotta deal with my present obligations first.
    It sure is tempting tho…
    Love & Peace, Clarence

  • http://www.live365.com/stations/claren44 Clarence Jones

    I agree wholeheartedly. I cannot allow myself to participate in any new social media sites/forums (fora?)/networking sites, because I don’t have enough free time to fully participate where I already am. I don’t want to water down my online life anymore! Even though LinkedIn & Facebook tempt me with the (fairly remote) possibility of making connections to improve the quality of my life ( & earn above poverty-level paychecks), I gotta deal with my present obligations first.
    It sure is tempting tho…
    Love & Peace, Clarence

  • http://talkitup.typepad.com/ Heidi Miller

    And I thought I was the only one. I was wondering where everyone else seem to find the time to write and research regular, intelligent blog posts, produce podcasts, follow Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, participate in Second Life… oh, yeah, and also write articles and DO THE WORK WE GET PAID FOR!

    Seriously, I’ve been feeling like I’m just not up to snuff because I can’t keep up with it all! I don’t want to give up on social media, but it’s getting so that every time I listen to FIR, I’m ten steps behind because I’m not down with the newest gadget on Second Life or what have you!

  • http://talkitup.typepad.com Heidi Miller

    And I thought I was the only one. I was wondering where everyone else seem to find the time to write and research regular, intelligent blog posts, produce podcasts, follow Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, participate in Second Life… oh, yeah, and also write articles and DO THE WORK WE GET PAID FOR!

    Seriously, I’ve been feeling like I’m just not up to snuff because I can’t keep up with it all! I don’t want to give up on social media, but it’s getting so that every time I listen to FIR, I’m ten steps behind because I’m not down with the newest gadget on Second Life or what have you!

  • Sam Grant

    Hi Lee, great thoughts on the need to scale back on our social interaction sites and I agree with Heidi that it’s starting to feel impossible to keep up with it all while doing the work we get paid for.

    We all love our online lives, and the way they interconnect with our offline lives, but I was told by someone close to me that we’re at risk of “choking on our own chocolates”. That made me laugh but he’s probably right. It’s just all too much of a good thing!

    However, although scaling back makes perfect sense, I still get the feeling that the neophiles amongst us may not be able to settle for accessing just a few regular sites and will always have the urge to discover that next “new thing”.

    As Clarence said: “It sure is tempting…”

  • Sam Grant

    Hi Lee, great thoughts on the need to scale back on our social interaction sites and I agree with Heidi that it’s starting to feel impossible to keep up with it all while doing the work we get paid for.

    We all love our online lives, and the way they interconnect with our offline lives, but I was told by someone close to me that we’re at risk of “choking on our own chocolates”. That made me laugh but he’s probably right. It’s just all too much of a good thing!

    However, although scaling back makes perfect sense, I still get the feeling that the neophiles amongst us may not be able to settle for accessing just a few regular sites and will always have the urge to discover that next “new thing”.

    As Clarence said: “It sure is tempting…”

  • http://leehopkins.net/ Lee Hopkins

    Hi y’all,

    My view is that if I limit myself to Facebook, Jaiku (because something good will sooner or later come of it) and FIR, then I will have it covered. I will stick with CommsNetwork simply because I have contractual arrangements with Melcrum, but to be honest FIR is where I get all of my ‘latest’ info. And because I have spent so much time playing with other stuff I’ve let my FIR-listening slip, a mistake I intend to rectify.

    The challenge we ALL face is that as social media evangelists we kind of need to know about all this stuff, especially when some snotty kid or their mother mentions a site and asks you your opinion of it. That’s where FIR is handy – they usually have reviewed it first. If *they* haven’t it’s probably not worth spending time on.

    And I still come back to my point that we were skilled at what we did *before* Web2.0 came along, it’s just that now the pace has changed (but only a bit; getting *onboard* in the first place, as we have all done, is the main thing).

  • http://leehopkins.net Lee Hopkins

    Hi y’all,

    My view is that if I limit myself to Facebook, Jaiku (because something good will sooner or later come of it) and FIR, then I will have it covered. I will stick with CommsNetwork simply because I have contractual arrangements with Melcrum, but to be honest FIR is where I get all of my ‘latest’ info. And because I have spent so much time playing with other stuff I’ve let my FIR-listening slip, a mistake I intend to rectify.

    The challenge we ALL face is that as social media evangelists we kind of need to know about all this stuff, especially when some snotty kid or their mother mentions a site and asks you your opinion of it. That’s where FIR is handy – they usually have reviewed it first. If *they* haven’t it’s probably not worth spending time on.

    And I still come back to my point that we were skilled at what we did *before* Web2.0 came along, it’s just that now the pace has changed (but only a bit; getting *onboard* in the first place, as we have all done, is the main thing).

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