Brighten up your building with trompe l’oeil

by Lee Hopkins on February 21, 2008 · 0 comments

in marketing,miscellaneous

trompe loeil in Puteaux, France 
“The place behind the old church in Puteaux, along the quai de Seine (Quai de Dion Bouton), has been beautifully restored and all the facades of buildings that overlook the square was painted in trompe l’oeil. Order at the moment the place is not open to the public, which is a great pity. It is surrounded by a high metal grille that has been recently repainted and their points were gilded with gold leaf.
La place de vieille église se trouve à 20 mètres du Pont de Puteaux. The place of old church is 20 meters away from the Bridge of Puteaux.”
Text copied from www.trompe-l-oeil.info

 

Word reaches me that Nairne, here in the Adelaide Hills, is the oldest town in South Australia, formed in 1839, a scant three years after the first visitors landed at Glenelg.

Lisa Symonds writes in The Courier, the award winning local paper here in the Adelaide Hills, that

“A Hills artist is helping to bring the history of Nairne to life with a series of murals the town hopes will also draw in tourists.”

liz hirstle and husband richard Now, the idea is apparently drawn from the success that Sheffield in Tasmania has achieved by drawing on the painting skills of Nairne’s own resident muralist, Liz Hirstle, who is also working with her local council to ‘paint the town red’ (and other colours).

Says Liz,

“[Sheffield] was a one horse town until somebody came up with the idea to do their historic murals. I took the idea to the community council and got their support and they have been raising money for me to paint ever since.”

Whilst it is no doubt heartening for Mrs Hirstle (as Lisa Symonds names her), there is a bigger idea here.

What if you are struggling for a way to ‘engage’ more with your local community?

Why not paint your building?

No, that doesn’t mean let the local graffiti hoons ‘tag’ it, but you might want to consider tracking down a local artist and have them add some considerable sparkle to the inside and outside of your building (and some valuable press coverage!) by painting some trompe l’oeil on your walls.

Here’s some spectacular examples of how it can look if done right (images courtesy of Wikipedia):

trompe l’oeil dome in the Jesuit church, Vienna, by Andrea Pozzo: the ceiling is only slightly coved trompe l'oeil dome in the Jesuit church, Vienna, by Andrea Pozzo: the ceiling is only slightly coved
Painted dome at Church of St Ignatius, Rome Painted dome at Church of St Ignatius, Rome
The interior of the cathedral in Biella (Italy) is a masterpiece of trompe-l’œil The interior of the cathedral in Biella (Italy) is a masterpiece of trompe-l'œil
Contemporary artist Linda Cassels-Hofmann’s trompe l’oeil black board Contemporary artist Linda Cassels-Hofmann's trompe l'oeil black board
You might not want to go as far as painting up some of your staff, however.

Cover of Body Painting: Masterpieces By Joanne Gair featuring Demi Moore

Cover of Body Painting: Masterpieces By Joanne Gair featuring Demi Moore

 

You can pick up a good idea of how popular trompe l’oeil is by wandering through some 19,000 examples!

Trivia: George Washington was allegedly once fooled by a trompe-l’œil painting when he visited the studio of Charles Willson Peale. Upon entering a room containing on its far wall such a painting of someone descending a stair (apparently into the room), he is said to have bowed to the figure before he realized it was a painting. The painting, Staircase Group showed two of Peale’s sons.

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Related post: A picture says a thousand words 

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