Chris Brogan’s Social Media newsletter

by Lee Hopkins on June 9, 2008 · 5 comments

in blogging,micro-blogging,reviews,social media newsletter,tools

There is a mighty force for good in the North American arm of the business communications social media empire, and his name be Chris Brogan.

If you’ve never heard of Chris, well now you have. He has been an unsung hero for many of us for quite a little while. I strongly encourage you to subscribe to his news feed and get his insights because the man is a towering giant of social media goodness.

He’s got a full-time gig as a new media consultant and to those of us who Twitter he seems permanently online. Some of us have wondered if he’s a vampire, as he never seems to need sleep.
:-)

Businesses approach Chris (and yours truly) for a better understanding of how they might use social media tools like blogging, video, and social networks to improve sales, build community, empower customer service, and move from “putting out a message” into “starting a meaningful conversation.”

Some of this information is easily found on his existing website, but if you want an even deeper dive, consider subscribing for free to his newsletter. It’s an absolute belter (Aussie slang meaning ‘exceptionally good’) and, unlike our Better Social Media Communication Results newsletter, comes with no damage to the hip pocket. You don’t get our graphics and ‘place it on your coffee table with pride’ design like ours, but what you DO get is similarly and absolutely crucial information about social media and its impacts on real world businesses.

Here’s some of the conversation starters from his latest fortnightly newsletter:

  • Brevity
  • A Paradox About Social Networks
  • Build a Social Media Lab
  • Five Tools to Check Out
  • Editorial: 1:51AM

THE SOUL OF WIT

Here’s a strange paradox: now that we have infinite shelf space, free or cheap media making capabilities, and free storage and distribution, it’s more important than ever that we adopt a practice of brevity. Why? Because it’s the new black, that’s why. Here’s more.

  • Brevity means people can take your ideas with them, chew on them, and do something with them.
  • Structuring your information into chunks means that you can reconfigure them in lots of ways. You can mix and match them to people’s needs. People will only chew off what they need.
  • Brevity tells people that you’ve distilled the essence of what you’re telling them.

Make sense?

Blimey – judging by the length of this post I must still be wearing my grey flannel suit!

  • http://chrisbrogan.com/ Chris Brogan…

    Thanks for the kind words, Lee. I’m just glad to be able to occasionally share the larger world stage with swell folks like you. I’m grateful for your kind words.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan…

    Thanks for the kind words, Lee. I’m just glad to be able to occasionally share the larger world stage with swell folks like you. I’m grateful for your kind words.

  • http://leehopkins.net/ Lee Hopkins

    Oh, knock it off, Chris! It is *I* who is grateful to share a stage with YOU! :-)

    But I tell you what — when we meet up we’ll draw (like in those ol’ westerns) to see who buys the first round of drinks! :-)

  • http://leehopkins.net Lee Hopkins

    Oh, knock it off, Chris! It is *I* who is grateful to share a stage with YOU! :-)

    But I tell you what — when we meet up we’ll draw (like in those ol’ westerns) to see who buys the first round of drinks! :-)

  • Anonymous

    I have written a guide which tells people how to write newsletter along with points to keep in mind while writing it

Previous post:

Next post: