links for 2009-01-29

by Lee Hopkins on January 30, 2009 · 0 comments

in clippings

  • Another in the long and ever-growing list of Twitter applications that serve no real purpose other than to waste one's time. You can auto-scour your followers to see who hasn't tweeted recently. But you can't then delete them, you have to go into your twitter account to do that. Pointless.
  • One of my favourite management thinkers, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, on how Obama has a golden, once in a lifetime, opportunity to reshape America's culture to make it great (rather than just the butt of far too many jokes). Delivered in the style of Letterman's Top 10, but very serious. I wholeheartedly concur with her, and wish that my Australian politicians and cultural leaders would take note and help engender a sense of perspective and ethic of "ask not what your country can do for you, but…" back into Australia.
  • "Missy Elliot didn’t mention her hips today. But I thought about ‘em anyway. And three hot and sweaty minutes later, my copywriting mojo was back."

    So says my mate Glenn in a great post about overcoming writer's block.

    "Of course, I’m not saying you can get away without knowing your market, your subject matter and the ‘rules’ of copywriting. To the contrary; these things are part of the foundation of your copywriting instinct. But just as you don’t give a moment’s thought to the foundations of your house when you’re painting your walls, nor should you pay the rules of copywriting much heed when you let your first draft flow.

    "PS. Next on the Shuffle was AC/DC’s ‘Hells Bells’. What IT taught me is, as they say, ‘a whole nother story’!"

    Unfortunately, it’s not as lurid as it sounds. But for this suburban white-boy copywriter, it was pretty exciting nonetheless.

  • The video, while only a few minutes long, provides a brief glimpse of the horrors she endured, including an encounter with the notorious Dr. Josef Mengele. The lecture becomes especially noteworthy in light of the technology being leveraged — the 87-year-old Starr has given many similar talks on her experiences throughout the past 30 years, but Second Life allowed her to reach a much wider audience without the burden of travel.

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