Information governance in a 2.0 world

by Lee Hopkins on April 18, 2009 · 0 comments

in clippings,tools

Just reading an interesting paper: “Information governance in a 2.0 world.” It’s in the March 2009 edition of Financial Executive.

Written by Cheryl McKinnon, the director of Program Management and part of the Enterprise2.0 strategy team at Open Text in Waterloo, Canada, Cheryl makes some interesting points:

  • “Corporate informafion disclosed or stored in emerging forms – community discussion sites, blogs, wikis, rich interactive audio or video – can be subject to discovery orders, even if the content is not physically hosted on premises. This precedent was made with the first case to deem text messages discoverable by court of law in Flagg V. City of Detroit in 2008″

  • “”How do we balance the productivity and peer-to-peer networking benefits with appropriate controls?” A smart place to begin is with education. Consider when email evolved into a mainstream business application more than a decade ago. In the early 1990s, email was reserved for only a few employees, often did not extend outside the firewall and was not considered a platform for official business transactions. As the cost of network and Internet access decreased, email evolved into the primary mode of communication among peers as well as with customers, partners, suppliers and prospects.

    “But governance strategies did not keep up. Only with recent changes in rules around electronic evidence and legal discovery obligations have companies been compelled to get their email management chaos under control.

    “These lessons learned should form the basis for a model of addressing the world of 2.0.

    “A starting point is appropriate use guidelines or policies formulated to address email. Intel Corp.’s corporate policy for social media engagement is widely accepted as a model for acceptable language, rules on information disclosure,consistency of form and branding for external communication. The rules developed for email usage can be adapted to cover new social software forms. Intel’s policy is published at http://www.intel.com/sites/sitewide/enJJS/socialmedia.htm.”

  • “Senior management still unsure of the benefits of more social approaches to communication and computing should test the waters: join a professional association or contribute to an industry wiki page, read technology blogs, etc.

    “The distinction between Web 2.0 to Enterprise 2,0 is the distinction between the Wild West and law and order. An information governance strategy for the 21st century lets companies adapt new tools for cost savings and customer engagement-without sacrificing the safety, security and content-protection requirements demanded by the modern compliance culture.”

Blimmin’ great reading and definitely worth grabbing hold of the article if you can and gently slipping it under the nose of your VP of IT or CTO.


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