On upgrading one’s personal technology, whether one wants to or not

by Lee Hopkins on April 24, 2009 · 0 comments

in marketing,pr,revenue models,tools

gom-blog

Courtesy of Gary Hayes, a man who has more brain power than should legally be allowed, has come much soul-searching and hand-wringing at BetterComms Towers.

In a discussion about revenue models in a 2.0 world, he pointed me off to Chris Anderson’s thought-piece over on Wired, ‘Free! Why $0.00 Is the Future of Business’.

Reading that, plus thinking about the geek-culturally-defined ‘transformational’ products like the Kindle and iPhone, I have received a large kick up the mental bum.

As I said at the end of my earlier rant about new business models, the genie is out of the bottle and therefore either I ‘get onboard’ or else die of extinction, noting that the rate of extinction in business is speeding up dramatically these days.

Charles Handy talked about new personal revenue models nearly three decades ago: the ‘portfolio worker’ as he termed it, wherein knowledge workers would generate revenue from more than one source. The death of the corporate slave, as it were, as a direct result of worker backlash against the rationalisation, downsizing, right-sizing, firing and redundancy initiatives of the 1980s, but only possible once the worker became the scarce commodity, not the job.

Forget this current recession; we will bounce back (economies do) and so the search for, managing and retaining talent will resume its heady place amongst corporate strategies.

So come the appropriate time (when my plan is up for renewal) I will get an iPhone, not because of the hype by Gen Y-ers, but because of the hype from old farts like me. Too many people who I respect have called the iPhone revolutionary and ‘game changing’.

So too with ebook readers – once a reader that allows annotations and isn’t tied to Amazon comes along I will probably buy one.

And likewise, as a result of Gary’s and Laurel Papworth’s direct prodding, I am letting my brain stew on new revenue models.

It isn’t about ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ or trying to be ‘young and hip’; it’s about staying in touch with the wave of new technology and thinking of ways to apply it to business. It’s about staying young with my thinking, rather than letting laziness and inertia get in the way of mental recharge and regeneration.


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