Lindsay Lohan and I agree on something

by Lee Hopkins on August 6, 2010 · 0 comments

in tools

Lindsay Lohan She may be out of jail and at the start of her three months of enforced rehab, but you can be as sure as eggs are eggs that she will be back to her shenanigans once she gets out.

“So where is the point of agreement, Lee?” you might be asking.

It’s that even before she *is* released she will again become a hot topic here on the interwebs and that, as sure as eggs don’t come from poodles, gripping headlines offering you ‘insider’ images will spread like a thing that spreads very rapidly.

Here’s some examples you might be offered to see:

  • Pictures from inside Lindsay’s rehab cell!
  • Lindsay’s rehab diary!
  • The after-rehab party to end all parties – shocking photos!

There’s a very real chance the links you click on will take you to a website with viruses, spyware, keylogging programs (where criminals can monitor everything you type), and other malicious software (‘Malware’), hoping to gain access to your computer and steal personal information.

So a little while back Lindsay partnered with Norton, the anti-virus people, to offer this message:

“I know I am very newsworthy, especially with everything going on and I’d hate to see my current situation cause frustration or damage to my fans.”

“If my friends and fans want to know what’s going on with me, they need to stick to reliable news media outlets and not click on just any link in a search result. Better yet, please follow my Twitter feed and get the news straight from me.”

Advice:

  • Cybercriminals use sensational headlines to get you to click on their poisoned links. Delete e-mails and ignore search results from people and sites you don’t know, no matter what they’re promising.
  • Use a safe search tool like the free Norton Safe Web Lite, which can identify poisoned search results. 
  • Take it from Lindsay: Sometimes your closest friends can be your worst enemies. Don’t assume links and videos posted by friends on social networking sites are safe. Use a free tool such as Norton Safe Web for Facebook to make sure sites don’t contain any malicious elements before you click on them.

Wise words, indeed.

Personally, I’ve never been without a copy of Norton on my computer since 2006 and I cannot recommend the software highly enough. The latest incarnations, with the brilliant browser toolbar login/identity manager, saves me hours – especially since I have just moved the entire password-protected list across from my laptop to my new Dell desktop and have instant access to all of my sites with absolutely no fuss at all.

Yes, for the last two years I’ve received a free copy of Norton 360, their flagship product, courtesy of the kind people at Norton, but because there are more than three computers here at BetterComms Towers I always nip down to Stirling Post Office to buy up an extra copy with my own hard-earned cash.

You’d be a mug not to do the same (although you can download it from the Norton site if crossing oceans and deserts and sleepy South Australian country towns is prohibitively expensive).


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