Are QR codes dead in Aus? I don’t think so

by Lee Hopkins on May 11, 2011 · 3 comments

in clippings,marketing,tools

Digital Media Group - Aus/NZ logoTHERE’S A great discussion happening over in the LinkedIn group Digital Media Group – Australia and New Zealand: Are QR codes dead outside of Japan and Korea?

The group is split roughly 50/50 on the answer, which is fine, and there are some terrific examples of where QR codes are being used.

Emily Loughnan commented:

I’m actually seeing QR codes more and more. At TED this year, the entire conference programme was full of them, for example.

Here’s some uses of QR codes, as found in the discussion

Shel Holtz also has a few posts about QR codes and their utility.

My favourite use is as a résumé (see this Vimeo video, below:)

QR CODE – Content-rich Resume from Victor petit on Vimeo.

Regular readers of this blog will remember that I had a QR code turned into a main feature of my business cards by Beth Sporne from ChinaShop.

There is a mob in the Netherlands who will create an online business card for you with a custom QR code – very neat! I only thought you could point to a website, but apparently you can do all sorts of stuff with it, including have it tattooed onto you! In March 2011 a tattoo parlor in Arizona reportedly began giving QR tag tattoos that linked to people’s websites and Facebook pages.

An argument against QR codes becoming more widely used

One of the arguments against the widespread use of QR codes is that there is no native application automatically added by the handset manufacturers/resellers that scans QR codes.

But that argument is false – there were no applications for Facebook or Twitter automatically added either, until those platforms became powerful enough to warrant it. If QR codes become ubiquitous enough, then perhaps code readers will be automatically added to new mobile phones as a matter of course. Google’s own Android handset includes a QR reader (ZXing) as part of the package on some of their phones.

I still think QR codes have a future, but like all who have grown up with McDonalds as part of their culture, I wish it would arrive *now*

 

imageUPDATE: Adelaide property consultants Raine & Horne’s North East office use QR codes on their display signs, and the Fullarton office use QR codes in their print adverts. Plus, the South Australian vineyard Shottesbrooke are considering putting the codes on their next batch of wines.


  • Marnie Macdonald

    My problem with QR codes is that the offers that I’ve clicked through are largely underwhelming … but i’m not looking to buy a house – Real Estate seems like a great application of them, especially if there’s some nifty ‘save to list’ etc features that help the buyer.

    Please don’t just send me to a boring campaign landing page!

  • http://twitter.com/malchia Mal Chia

    Interesting how the buzz around QR codes has increased again following SXSW. Aside from the native reader argument, there is a greater issue around education and adoption by the everyday public. The value proposition is usually either poor or poorly stated. Particularly as you are asking someone typically in transit to care enough to stop and scan a QR code this needs to be made quite obvious.

    Like Marnie, the times I have stopped to do it it has been underwhelming. Personally I’m more interested in NFC which promises to do even more and require less user effort!

  • http://www.LeeHopkins.net/ Lee Hopkins

    I was at a meeting today and someone didn’t know what ‘QR codes’ were. But when I showed her my business card with one on it, she immediately responded that she used those when flicking through magazines getting recipes. She uses the codes to capture the ingredients then she knows what to get when next shopping…

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